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Whipping up a storm

Richard Hughes has handed in his jockey licence over the new whip rules introduced this week.
I have some sympathy for him. In fact quite a lot. Jockeys are paid to do a job: to get their horse into the best possible finishing position in a race – preferably in the money if not the winner’s enclosure.

Hughes is not against hitting horses less during a race. This is where we slightly part company.
I am against hitting horses in a race, but if you are allowed to carry a whip and everyone else is using them to achieve the stated aim of achieving the best finishing position whaddya gonna do?

Asking someone to count the times they use the whip, and confine yourself to only 5 uses in the last furlong (the one where you ride the finish) is asking people to distract themselves from the task in hand. Pass the final furlong pole, ask or keep your horse up to its effort, bring it wide or find a gap, keep it straight and count, count, count, count, count. Richard Hughes used his whip 6 times – you can use it for a total of 7 in a race, but no more than 5 of those must be in the final furlong – so he’s in breach of the new rules.

He’s one of our most experienced jockeys and I am sure he can count, but expecting people to work one way for years and then just switch to another is asking a lot. Hughsie said on the radio this morning jockeys had been trying to practice it a bit in the run-up to the new rule; clearly it’s not worked.

When I was first into racing I was in a racing club where the horses were raced without shoes and the jockey was not allowed to use the whip. The jockey had to carry one in accordance with the Rules of Racing, but the trainer and owners stipulated it was not to be used. Incredibly, for those people who couldn’t countenance racing without hitting horses, sometimes these horses won races. And I can tell you as a spectacle and as someone who respects and appreciates animals it’s far more attractive and enjoyable to pick up some winnings without your jockey picking up a whip ban.

Just get rid of the damn thing and have done. Good riders will manage without them perfectly well. Lazy horses might be more lazy, but so what? Horses might run straight when they aren’t running away from the whip, so we might see less inteference in finishes and the wider public will have to lose the perception that animals are beaten in the pursuit of entertainment and money.

Asking professional riders to count up to 5 in the final furlong is a multitask too far it seems.

Hughsie with his redundant persuader and Canford Cliffs

Bad day @ the office

That would cover Richard Hughes’ day chasing the jockeys’ championship this afternoon at Newmarket. The scowl from him and his mount, Tale Untold, is probably due to being beaten into second by a short head in the valuable Fillies 2yo Trophy. No wonder she’s cutting her eye at me.

Things picked up a bit for our boy on Carnaby Street in the 16:50, where he was on the right side of another short head, but then the wheels really fell off the wagon. He left early to get to Wolvo, leaving Ryan Moore to clean up in the last on the Hannon trained 25/1 shot Lethal Glaze. Then matters really went downhill. Having travelled all the way to the West Midlands for some rides with chances, he was found guilty of using the whip with excessive frequency on Tallawalla who then only finished second. The only mount to oblige was Aviso by a neck in the last, wherein Hughes picked up a whopping seven day ban for causing havoc on a bend.

Hughes is appealing but with Paul Hanagan still holding the upper hand, having also ridden a double at Redcar, it looks like Richard Hannon’s son-in-law can kiss the jockeys’ title goodbye.

Dick Turpin: victorious in le Prix Jean Prat Chantilly (Group 1!)

          

                   Richard gives him a kiss from me after winning today.

                   Not just a win, a withering burst of speed to take 4 lengths out of the field.

                   On wishes and horses indeed.

Bien sûr, c’est Dicque Turpine en Français